Iran, powers give themselves to Monday for nuclear deal
Iran, powers give themselves to Monday for nuclear deal
Iran rejects sanctions extension beyond 10 years

Based on Reports Published between Fri Jul 10 18:40:45 2015 and Wed Jul 22 13:04:45 2015

Source Reports: (show)



Information from Fri Jul 10 18:40:45 2015 :

(Show Summary)

But the negotiations have become bogged down, with final deadlines extended three times in the past 10 days and diplomats speaking of a shouting match between Kerry and Zarif. The negotiators missed a Friday morning deadline set by the U. S. Congress for an expedited 30-day review of the deal. But in another sign that a deal could soon be sealed, Russian news agencies reported that Russian Foreign Minister U. S. officials had previously expressed concern that the extended review would provide more time for any deal to unravel, but have played down that risk in the last few days as it became increasingly likely that the deadline would not be met.

On Thursday, Kerry suggested Washington's patience was running out: "We can French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius also was cautiously optimistic, telling reporters: "I hope that we are finally entering the last phase of this negotiation."

"If the tough decisions don t get made, we are absolutely prepared to call an end to this."

Ali Akbar Velayati, top adviser to Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, called Kerry's remarks "part of America's psychological warfare against Iran". Britain, China, France, Germany, Russia and the United States - are trying to end a more than 12-year dispute over Iran's atomic program by negotiating limits on its nuclear activities in exchange for sanctions relief. The sides remain divided over issues that include a U. N. arms embargo on Iran which Western powers want to keep in place, access for inspectors to military sites in Iran and answers from Tehran over past activity suspected of military aims.

Iran's foreign minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said a deal was unlikely to be reached on Friday and negotiators would probably spend the weekend in Vienna.

He sought to blame the West for the impasse.

"Now, they have excessive demands," he said of the major powers' negotiating position. Britain's Hammond said ministers would regroup on Saturday to see if they could overcome the remaining hurdles.

"We are making progress, it's painfully slow," he told reporters before leaving Vienna.

Zarif has been holding intense meetings for two weeks with U. S. Secretary of State John Kerry to try to hammer out a deal limiting Iran's nuclear program in return for withdrawing economic sanctions that have crippled the Iranian economy. An agreement would be the biggest step toward rapprochement between Iran and the West since the 1979 Islamic Revolution, although both sides are likely to remain wary of each other even if a deal is concluded.

Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei said Tehran would continue its fight against "global arrogance" - referring to the United States. "Suddenly everyone has their own red lines. Britain has its red line, the U. S. has its red line, France, Germany," the official said.

Back in Iran, Friday provided a reminder of the depth of more than three decades of enmity between Iran and the West that a deal could help overcome. Iranians rallied for the last Friday of the fasting month of Ramadan, observed in Iran as "Qods Day" or "Death to Israel day", to show support for Palestinians, protest against Israel and chant slogans against the "Great Satan" United States. Western countries suspect Iran of seeking the capability to make nuclear weapons.

Iran says it has the right to peaceful nuclear technology. Over the past two years, the nuclear talks have brought about the first intensive direct diplomacy between the United States and Iran since Iranian revolutionaries stormed the U. S. embassy in Tehran in 1979 and held hostages for over a year.

A successful outcome would be a triumph both for U. S. President Barack Obama and Iran's President Hassan Rouhani, a pragmatist elected in 2013 on a pledge to reduce Iran's international isolation. Optimists say a deal could help reshape Middle East alliances at a time when Washington and Tehran face a common foe in the Sunni militant group Islamic State.

But both presidents face scepticism from powerful hardliners at home, making it difficult to bridge final differences.

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif gestures as he talks with journalist from a balcony of the Palais Coburg hotel where the Iran nuclear talks meetings are being held in Vienna, Austria July 10, 2015. British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond (C) attends a meeting with foreign ministers and representatives of United States, France, Germany, China, Russia and the European Union during nuclear talks at a hotel in Vienna, Austria July 10 U. S. Secretary of State John Kerry meets with foreign ministers and representatives from Germany, France, China, Britain, Russia and the European Union during nuclear talks at a hotel in Vienna, Austria July 10, 2015.

  (Show Summary)


Information from Fri Jul 10 18:40:47 2015 :
(Show Summary)

Will Marshall is the president of the .

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.

Americans who didn't get their fill of fireworks over the July Fourth holiday can expect more pyrotechnics this week if U. S.-led talks in Austria's capital produce a nuclear accord with Iran.

To hear his critics tell it, President Barack Obama is desperate to strike a nuclear bargain with Iran -- even a bad one -- to burnish an otherwise lackluster foreign policy legacy. Leading the alarmist chorus is , who claims that Obama is poised to sign "the worst international agreement in U. S. diplomatic history." The main burden of proof, however, should fall not on Obama but on skeptics of a nuclear deal with Iran.

The President's harshest critics, including conservative hard-liners such as Krauthammer, and some Sunni Arab leaders, have set the bar for an acceptable agreement impossibly high.

They demand that Tehran shutter its entire nuclear program, end support for Hezbollah and other extremist groups, and stop meddling in the affairs of Lebanon, Syria, Iraq and Yemen.

All this would be nice, of course, but it would require fundamentally transforming the political character and aims of the Islamic republic. That's not what some of America's key negotiating partners -- Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany -- signed up for. What holds this improbable but formidable coalition together is a common interest in keeping Iran from joining the nuclear club.

The deal under discussion in Vienna won't guarantee that outcome, but it will move Tehran back from the nuclear threshold for the next decade or so. In fact, the bar for a deal America and its partners can live with is pretty low: It only has to be better than no deal. Keep that essential fact in mind as Obama's critics berate him for allowing those crafty Persians to take him to the cleaners.

Despite years of diplomatic isolation, punishing economic sanctions and hard bargaining with world powers, Iran has never agreed to dismantle its nuclear program altogether. It's not even clear that Iran's Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, will countenance key elements of the deal currently on the table -- the one Obama's critics consider fatally weak.

Nonetheless, there's no doubt that President Hassan Rouhani is eager to break his country out of political quarantine and to win relief from international sanctions that, along with falling oil prices, have hammered its economy.

In exchange, its leaders are promising to limit nuclear enrichment, for the next 10 to 15 years, to levels sufficient for civilian nuclear power, but not making bombs. Given Tehran's record of nuclear secrecy and deceit, there's no reason for Washington to accept such claims at face value, but a verifiable nuclear deal would enable the world to monitor Tehran's actions, whatever its intentions. Yet many in Congress persist in arguing that, by ratcheting up sanctions, America can force Tehran to forgo all uranium enrichment.

This supposedly tough-minded posture overstates our leverage and underestimates Iran's prickly resolve to defend its sovereignty in the face of U. S. bullying.

Recognizing that Iranian leaders can't readily make concessions to the "Great Satan," Obama has shrewdly assembled a broader coalition that includes all the permanent members of the U. N. Security Council. Yet if Congress rejects an agreement or insists on passing new sanctions unilaterally, that coalition would swiftly unravel.

This would be a huge strategic gift to Iran's own hard-liners and America-haters.

So the real choice we may face this week is between a deal that puts real constraints on Iran's nuclear program, or no deal at all.

A German government source said a deal could be reached quickly if Tehran was ready to take the last steps, adding that it was still possible for the negotiations to fail.

It means no international inspections of Iran's nuclear or military sites. And it could mean resumption of Tehran's original plans to produce plutonium at its Arak reactor, giving it a second path to the bomb.

What's more, an unfettered Iranian nuclear program would likely induce Saudi Arabia and other Arab states, already unnerved by Iranian imperialism in the region, to launch their own nuclear programs. This would conjure up U. S. strategists' worst nightmare -- a nuclear arms race in the world's most unstable and terror-plagued region. It would raise the odds of a military strike on Iran's scattered nuclear facilities, possibly by the United States but more likely by Israel. If, on the other hand, a final deal hews to "parameters" negotiators have already agreed to, it would enhance U. S. security and reduce the risk of regional proliferation. These include steep reductions in the number of centrifuges installed, and no production of highly enriched uranium for at least 15 years; a redesign of the Arak reactor so it doesn't produce plutonium; and, regular international inspections of Iran's nuclear facilities and nuclear supply chain.

In return, the international coalition would agree to lift sanctions as Iran fulfills its commitments. Obama can't accept this demand. But if Iranian officials can compose their own differences -- chiefly by selling the deal to Khamenei -- America and the world would reap real security gains. Specifically, the deal under discussion would extend the "breakout" period -- the time Iran would need to acquire enough fissile material to make one nuclear bomb -- from the current two to three months to a year. didn't end the Cold War, but it bred habits of cooperation that helped to manage and eventually de-escalate the superpower nuclear arms race. Keeping Iran's nuclear program on "pause" likewise beats what Obama's conservative critics are peddling -- a fantasy of complete Iranian capitulation to America's righteous demands.

  (Show Summary)


Information from Sat Jul 11 04:40:49 2015 :
(Show Summary)

"The deal is within reach today," a senior Iranian official told Reuters.

Iran Air's Parvaresh also told Reuters last year that Iran would give preference to suppliers who had cooperated during a window for sanctions relief that opened up in 2014. Boeing said in October it had sold aircraft manuals, drawings, charts and data to Iran Air in its first acknowledged dealings since the 1979 hostage crisis that wrecked U. S.-Iranian relations and triggered a U. S. boycott. The European Union does not specifically prohibit civil aviation trade with Iran but banned the export of 'dual use' technology in 2007 and has progressively tightened restrictions since then, effectively ruling out sales of civil aircraft and jet engines. Airbus said it had applied for export licences under the scheme for temporary sanctions relief that allowed the sale of some aircraft parts, but declined to say whether any goods or services had actually been provided.

Iranian officials say unrestricted monitoring could be a cover for Western spying.

"There is no trust when it comes to Iran," said Senator Ben Cardin, the senior Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee that would examine any deal as part of the U. S. Congress' 60-day review. year dispute over Tehran's nuclear ambitions, extending talks through the weekend. For Tehran, the prospect of sweeping economic sanctions and a long-standing U. S. trade embargo being lifted represents a chance to renew a fleet whose average age of 23 years is almost twice the international average, and to do so at affordable prices, after years of paying over the odds on the black market.

For Airbus, Boeing and other manufacturers, that could mean up to $20 billion in deals, shaped in part by the negotiating positions of various camps during the lengthy nuclear talks. "There are a lot of aircraft that are really at the end of their lives," said Maximo Gainza, senior consultant at UK-based fleet watcher Ascend Flightglobal. "Iran is going to be a very hot market as and when sanctions are lifted." The chairman of Iran Air, Farhad Parvaresh, told Reuters last year that, as soon as sanctions were eased, Iran would seek to obtain at least 100 wide-body and short-haul jets, but that it would turn to Russia and China if nuclear talks collapsed.

Officials cite a broad potential shopping list, from the latest Boeing 787 and Airbus A350 lightweight jets to workhorses such as the Boeing 737 and 777 or the Airbus A320 and A330 and even the most recent version of the jumbo, the Boeing 747-8, still in production but with declining sales. Boeing appears best placed to take advantage of the first wave of sales, partly because France, which is home to Airbus and owns 11 percent of the firm, took a particularly hard line with Iran in the nuclear talks, according to industry sources, diplomats and people familiar with Iranian thinking. Paris has become more hawkish toward Tehran in recent years as France aligns itself with Shi'ite Iran's Sunni rivals across the Gulf, Qatar and Saudi Arabia.

"The position of the French, particularly (foreign minister Laurent) Fabius, has not made things easy for Airbus," said a European aviation industry source, asking not to be identified. Iran's transport minister last month warned France it risked missing out on $80 billion worth of business unless it changed its stance towards Tehran.

A French Senate panel recently expressed concerns that local firms were falling behind in the race to Tehran.

"Being the first one in doesn't mean you'll be the first served," responded a senior French government official.

We sold a lot of planes there before, and that fleet is really old. re staying on the sidelines," Boeing Commercial Airplanes CEO Ray Conner told Reuters in Washington this week.

Some industry analysts urge caution in projecting the number of planes Iran's airline industry will eventually order, noting that, to sustain a large fleet, it also needs to develop profitable passenger business - by opening up the domestic market and building up an attractive international hub.

The Chinese and Russian foreign ministers have said they will come to Vienna if a deal appears close. Fabius said he hoped the high-stakes negotiations were finally drawing to a close. In the long term, Iran has strategic ambitions to rival Gulf cities as a hub attracting traffic from Western Europe and North America to the Asia-Pacific region.

But getting a new fleet of aircraft flying quickly may need more than a lifting of sanctions.

After a boom in airplane demand, the major Western manufacturers are sold out for most of the rest of the decade.

Experts say Iran may have to resort to the second-hand market or lease planes to get started. But leasing firms will want to clarify thorny issues such as jurisdiction that have gathered dust during its enforced absence from the market. "There is not much choice because of the way production lines are sold out," said Tony Whitty, CEO of UK-based aircraft trading company Cabot Aviation.

"In the short term, if you go to Airbus and Boeing, you have got to wait three or four years." In the interim, that could mean leasing, or buying second-hand, outmoded four-engined models such as less recent versions of the Boeing 747, or the out-of-production Airbus A340.

  (Show Summary)


Information from Sat Jul 11 08:40:49 2015 :
(Show Summary)

the official said.

Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif (R) listens to questions from journalists as he stands next to Iran's chief nuclear negotiator Abbas Araghchi (L) and Hossein Fereydoon (2nd L), brother and close aide to President Hassan Rouhani, on the balcony of Palais Coburg, the... s chief nuclear negotiator Abbas Araghchi (left) and Hossein Fereydoon (second from left), brother and close aide to President Hassan Rouhani, on the balcony of Palais Coburg, in Vienna, Austria, yesterday. Iran and the six powers involved in the talks have given themselves until Monday to reach a deal, their third extension in two weeks, as the Iranian delegation accused the West of throwing up new stumbling blocks to an accord. Both sides say there has been progress in two weeks of talks, but British Secretary Philip Hammond called it Britain, China, France, Germany, Russia and the United States are trying to end a more than 12-year dispute over Iran s atomic program by negotiating limits on its nuclear activities in exchange for sanctions relief. s painfully slow, Ali Akbar Velayati, top adviser to Iran s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, called Kerry to show support for Palestinians, protest against Israel and chant slogans against the

  (Show Summary)


Information from Sat Jul 11 13:41:45 2015 :
(Show Summary)

It remained unclear whether Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov would return on Saturday. Kerry and Zarif met on Saturday with European Union foreign policy chief Frederica Mogherini and were conferring with other foreign ministers involved.

German Foreign Minister Frank Walter Steinmeier and French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius are both in Vienna. British Foreign Secretary Phillip Hammond was expected later Saturday.

Negotiations over Iran's nuclear program blew past the two-week mark in Vienna on Saturday ahead of a new deadline for a deal, with the United States and Those comments came a day after he had declared for the second time in the current round that the negotiations could not be open-ended, warned that the U. S. was prepared to call an end to the talks and challenged Iran to make tough choices to seal a deal.

Zarif responded by accusing the United States and its European partners of backtracking on previous commitments and calling on the U. S. to end its "obsession" with sanctions. Friday's tougher rhetoric mirrored negotiators' frustrations. The current round that was supposed to conclude on June 30, but was extended until July 7, then July 10 and now July 13.

The scope of access to U. N. inspectors monitoring Iran's nuclear program remains a sticking point.

The Americans want no restrictions.

Diplomats say Iran's negotiators have signaled awillingness to compromise, but hardliners in Iran remain opposed to broad U. N. inspections. Another unresolved matter is Iran's demand for a U. N. arms embargo to be lifted as part of sanctions relief, a stance supported by and China but opposed by the U. S. and some Europeans. The sides had hoped to seal a deal before the end of Thursday in Washington to avoid delays in implementing their promises. By missing that target, the U. S. and Iran now have to wait for a 60-day congressional review period during which President Barack Obama cannot waive sanctions on Iran. Had they reached a deal by Thursday, the review would have been only 30 days. Iran is unlikely to begin a substantial rollback of its nuclear program until it gets sanctions relief in return.

This story has been corrected to reflect that the talks have gone past four deadlines and into three extensions.

  (Show Summary)


Information from Sat Jul 11 14:40:55 2015 :
(Show Summary)

Among the biggest sticking points this week has been Iran's insistence that a United Nations Security Council arms embargo and ban on its ballistic missile program dating from 2006 be lifted immediately if an agreement is reached. Russia, which sells weapons to Iran, has been publicly supporting Tehran on this issue. However, a senior Western diplomat said earlier in the week the six powers remained united, despite Moscow's and Beijing's well-known dislike of the embargos. Western powers have long suspected Iran of aiming to build nuclear bombs and using its civilian atomic energy program to cloak its intention - an accusation Iran strongly denies.

Other problematic issues in the talks are access for inspectors to military sites in Iran, answers from Tehran over past activity and the overall speed of sanctions relief.

Kerry and Zarif have met nearly every day since Kerry arrived in Vienna more than two weeks ago for what was intended to be the final phase in a negotiation process that began with an interim nuclear deal clinched in November 2013.

Kerry met Zarif again on Sunday, a U. S. official said, in an attempt to break the deadlock. The U. S. delegation has not provided readouts of Saturday's meetings. German Foreign Minister Frank Walter Steinmeier (L), French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius (2nd L), EU Deputy Secretary General for the External Action Service Helga Schmid (7th L), European Union High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Federica... VIENNA Iran, the United States and other major powers struggled on Saturday to break a deadlock in nuclear talks that has held up a historic deal that would bring sanctions relief for Tehran in exchange for curbs on its atomic program. "Still have difficult issues to resolve," U. S. Secretary of State John Kerry tweeted on Saturday after meeting Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif. Also present at Saturday's meeting was European Union foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini.

"A couple of differences have been decided ... It's safe to say we have made progress," he said, without giving any details.

French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius returned to Vienna on Saturday. British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond said on Friday he would also return soon.

The Russian foreign ministry told Reuters his travel plans had not been finalized.

The White House said on Friday the United States and its partners "have never been closer" to agreement with Iran but that the U. S. delegation would not wait indefinitely.

  (Show Summary)


Information from Sun Jul 12 11:43:15 2015 :
(Show Summary)

Iran's state-run Press TV cited Ayatollah as calling the U. S. an "excellent example of arrogance."

It said Khamenei told university students in Tehran to be "prepared to continue the struggle against arrogant powers." Netanyahu says that Iran "does not hide its intentions" and warned the world against placating it. Israel's leader says Western powers are "caving" into Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, a fierce opponent of what he considers a deal that is too lenient on Tehran, said Khamenei's comments showed that Western powers are "caving" into Iran even as the Islamic Republic keeps railing against them.

Responding to the Iranian supreme leader's call to continue the struggle against the United States regardless of the outcome of nuclear talks, says Sunday his country will not accept such a reality.

Nuclear talks in Vienna aimed at placing restrictions on Iran's nuclear program in exchange for a lifting of sanctions continue.

  (Show Summary)


The diplomats spoke ahead of Monday's target date for a pact meant to impose long-term, verifiable limits on nuclear programs that Tehran could modify to produce weapons. The talks are now in their 16th day and have been extended three times since the first deadline of March 31 was missed.



Information from Sun Jul 12 12:43:17 2015 :
(Show Summary)

U. S. Secretary of State , who on Thursday had threatened to walk away from the negotiations, note that "a few tough things" remain in the way of agreement but added: "We're getting to some real decisions."

Kerry says he is "hopeful" after his last meeting with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif. After days of saying Iranian nuclear talks can go either way, U. S. Secretary of State would get tens of billions of dollars in sanctions relief in return.

  (Show Summary)


Information from Sun Jul 12 13:43:15 2015 :
(Show Summary)

Russia, which sells weapons to Iran, has publicly supported Tehran on the issue.

"I think it's going to be a very hard sell, if it's completed, in Congress," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said on the "Fox News Sunday" broadcast.

In a sign that something might be in the works, both Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi were expected to join the talks. A senior Iranian official echoed Kerry's cautious optimism. VIENNA Iran and six world powers were close to nailing down an historic nuclear deal that would bring sanctions relief in exchange for curbs on Tehran's atomic program but diplomats said an agreement was highly unlikely on Sunday.

However, a senior U. S. official played down speculation that an agreement was in the works on Sunday, and reiterated Kerry's point that "major issues remain to be resolved in these talks." "I think we're getting to some real decisions," Kerry told reporters in the Austrian capital. "So I will say, because we have a few tough things to do, I remain hopeful. Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said on Sunday further measures were still needed to overcome the remaining obstacles in the Vienna negotiations, ISNA news agency reported.

In a sign that prospects for a deal on Sunday were vanishing, British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond was on his way back to London, though he was expected to return on Monday, officials close to the talks said.

The goal of the deal is to increase the time it would take for Iran to produce enough enriched uranium fuel for a single weapon to at least one year from current estimates of 2-3 months - the "breakout" time. If there is a deal, the limits on Iran's enrichment program are expected to be in place for at least a decade.

U. S. Secretary of State John Kerry leaves Stephen's Cathedral after attending a mass in Vienna, Austria July 12, 2015. U. S. Secretary of State John Kerry waves as he leaves Stephen's Cathedral after attending a mass in Vienna, Austria July 12, 2015.

According to his website, Khamenei was asked by a student what would happen to the "fight against global arrogance" after the completion of the nuclear talks and the supreme leader replied that fight must go on. "Fighting global arrogance is the core of our revolution and we cannot put it on hold. Get ready to continue your fight against the global arrogance," Khamenei was quoted as saying. "The U. S. is the true embodiment of the global arrogance."

But Khamenei did not set any new "red lines" for his negotiators as he did in a tough speech two weeks ago.

  (Show Summary)


Information from Sun Jul 12 14:43:23 2015 :
(Show Summary)

Negotiations over Iran's nuclear program appeared Sunday to be on the cusp of an historic agreement that would place limits on Tehran's atomic work in exchange for relief from crippling sanctions.

After more than two weeks of intense and often combative talks that blew through three deadlines in Vienna and a weekend of deadlock, diplomats expressed optimism that a deal was at hand. The mood among negotiators has turned more somber each time a new target date was set. planned to arrive in Vienna on Sunday evening. Most other foreign ministers of the six nations negotiating with Iran already are in the Austrian capital and in position to join Kerry and Zarif for any announcement of an agreement. But over the past week issues that were previously on the back burner have led to new disputes.

A diplomat familiar with the negotiations said disagreements also persist on how long some of the restrictions on imports of nuclear technology and other embargos outlined in any new Security Council resolution will last. The diplomat, who demanded anonymity because the diplomat was not allowed to discuss the confidential talks, said restrictions will last for years, not months.

Despite Kerry's relatively upbeat take, comments by Iran's supreme leader suggested that Tehran's mistrust of Washington would persist no matter what the outcome of the talks. on Saturday as calling the U. S. an "excellent example of arrogance."

Even if Khamenei isn't signaling that the talks have failed, his comments appeared to be a blow to U. S. hopes that an agreement will lead to improved bilateral relations that could translate into increased cooperation in a common cause Zarif had hinted at just that last week, suggesting a deal acceptable to his country will open the door to joint efforts on that front.

  (Show Summary)


Information from Sun Jul 12 15:43:26 2015 :
(Show Summary)

nuclear talks are expected to reach a provisional agreement Sunday on a historic deal that would curb the country's atomic program in return for sanctions relief, diplomats told The Associated Press. The two diplomats cautioned that final details of the pact were still being worked out Sunday afternoon and a formal agreement still awaits a review from the capitals of the seven nations at the talks. The diplomats, who are at the talks, demanded anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the negotiations publicly.

The agreement would cap nearly a decade of diplomacy, including the current round in Vienna that has run more than two weeks and blown through three deadlines.

Even before the envoys spoke to The AP, the nuclear negotiations appeared well on the way to an agreement.

  (Show Summary)


Information from Sun Jul 12 16:43:17 2015 :
(Show Summary)

"We are working hard, but a deal tonight is simply logistically impossible," Alireza Miryousefi, a spokesman for the Iranian delegation, said on Twitter. "This is a 100-page document, after all."

Experts and senior officials from Iran, the United States and the other powers have been meeting non-stop for months, often working into the early hours of the morning, to finalize an accord that will include five technical annexes. In Washington, the top Republican in the U. S. Senate cast doubt on whether President Barack Obama will be able to win approval in Congress for any deal. "We already know it's going to leave Iran as a threshold nuclear state."

"Some 99 percent of the issues have been resolved and the agreement is ready," said an Iranian diplomat. "With political will, we can finish the work late tonight and announce it tomorrow. But still there are at least two issues to be resolved."

"I believe it," he added.

"France's position has been one of constructive firmness and I hope it will allow is to reach the end now, quickly, for a satisfying result."

In a sign that something might be in the works, both Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi were also due to join the talks on Sunday.

  (Show Summary)


In a sign that something might be in the works, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov arrived in Vienna and Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi was due on Sunday, but the schedule for ministerial talks was unclear. French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius canceled a planned trip to Central African Republic and Ethiopia due to the continued deadlock in the Iran negotiations, a French diplomatic source said.



Information from Sun Jul 12 21:43:44 2015 :
(Show Summary)

imposed deadline for clinching a deal, though that could be extended again.

"We still have got work to do tomorrow," Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif told reporters from his hotel balcony. The goal of the deal being negotiated would be to increase the time it takes for Iran to produce enough enriched uranium fuel for a single weapon to at least one year from current estimates of two to three months - the "breakout" time.

"It might seem we have reached the top of the mountain. "Even if we fail ... we have performed our duty." A leading Democrat also struck a downbeat note.

French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius canceled a planned trip to Africa due to the continued deadlock in the Iran negotiations, a French diplomatic source said. "Some 99 percent of the issues have been resolved and the agreement is ready," the official said.

  (Show Summary)